Saratoga Glen Farm welcomes back injured filly

Kathy Barraclough of Saratoga Glen Farm, an exercise rider at Saratoga Race Course, was happy to take back Heartfelt Jazz.

Kathy Barraclough of Saratoga Glen Farm, an exercise rider at Saratoga Race Course, was happy to take back Heartfelt Jazz.

When Heartfelt Jazz was vanned off Finger Lakes racetrack this past spring, the lightly raced filly soon found helping hands and a welcome home with the breeder who brought her into this world.

Dan and Kathy Barraclough of Saratoga Glen Farm say they did not hesitate to take back their filly when they were contacted by Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc., of New York, notifying them that the pretty bay with a heart-shape marking over her shoulder had been injured, and that they had saved her and two other horses from the possibility of winding up in the slaughter pipeline.

Dan Barraclough says he and his wife were happy to take her back.

Heartfelt Jazz
Sire: Grand Slam
Dam: Val’s Jazz
Foal date: May 7, 2011
“We’ve been blessed to be able to make a living doing what we love. The horses have been good to us, to allow us this lifestyle, so we owe it to them to take care of them” in their time of need, says Dan Barraclough.

So committed is the 15-year-old breeding farm to looking out for their own, that Kathy Barraclough notes they are now putting notes on Jockey Club papers welcoming future owners to contact Saratoga Glen Farm if they need to return a horse. “Our horses are out there trying to do a job, and they’re helping owners and breeders make money. If someone can’t give them a good home, we want to be the next option in line, so they can come back to us, and still have a career when their race days end,” she says.

Heartfelt Jazz relaxes at Second Chance Thoroughbreds in New York before moving on to live with her breeder. Photo courtesy Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc.

Heartfelt Jazz relaxes at Second Chance Thoroughbreds in New York before moving on to live with her breeder. Photo courtesy Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc.

The Barracloughs each have deep ties with horses. She is a native Australian who rode three-day events before moving to the US and working as an exercise rider at Saratoga. He rode hunter/jumpers prior to opening their business down the road from The Spa and breeding to NY, Kentucky, Florida and Pennsylvania stallions.

“Our philosophy is that we try to help every horse we can. Sometimes my wife is asked by a trainer to help a horse she gallops at the track; there’s a bunch of exercise riders who help (re-home horses) who you never hear about,” he says. “We’ve taken in a lot of broodmares who are lame when they get here, and who are perfectly sound two years later.”

He adds, “For us, it’s the ones who have a strike against them who we tend to gravitate toward, because we know their future isn’t as bright if we don’t take them ourselves.”

So when they got a call from Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc., a NY based horse charity that took in Heartfelt Jazz after she injured herself in an April 29th race, they readily agreed to take her back.

“We bred and sold her. We still own her mare,” Dan Barraclough says. “My wife’s name was on her papers, so they called her, and she arrived about two weeks ago.”

Heartfelt Jazz was assessed, and quickly buddied up with a pasture pal, he says, noting that in no time she seemed to get the hang of farm life, galloping over her grassy field.

Described as having a great attitude, any soreness she felt after her last race seems to be easing by the day, he adds.

Heartfelt Jazz, on right, gallops in her field at Saratoga Glen Farm. She was returned to her breeder after she was injured at Finger Lakes.

Heartfelt Jazz, on right, gallops in her field at Saratoga Glen Farm. She was returned to her breeder after she was injured at Finger Lakes.

His wife says that the plan now is to let Heartfelt Jazz take it easy this fall and winter, put on some weight, and in the spring they’ll reassess her. “She might just stay here and be a buddy for weanlings. She might make a great elder horse to watch over them, and to train beside them when we teach them to load and unload,” Kathy Barraclough says.

Although Second Chance Thoroughbreds, Inc., made a point to thank her and her husband for taking back their filly, crediting them as a “responsible breeder,” the Barracloughs say no thanks needed.

“I do think we should all take responsibility,” Kathy Barraclough says. “If all true horse people and horse lovers did the right thing, we wouldn’t have to worry about it so much. I would hope that everyone would take a normal amount of responsibility to help their horses.”

16 responses to “Saratoga Glen Farm welcomes back injured filly”

  1. Karen Faillace

    There is plenty more to this story that needs to be told Susan Stalk. I believe you were offered the information before it was published. The real kudos should go to Second Chance Thoroughbreds, inc. of Ny.

  2. Lucinda Finley

    And also a big thank you to Second Chance Thoroughbreds, who found Jazz with a dealer about to go to a kill auction, and purchased her and two other TBs (all three from the same owner/trainer)from the dealer to insure their safety.
    And while Saratoga Glen’s wonderful responsible action insures a happy ending for Jazz, the racetrack owner and the trainer of Jazz certainly have the resources to try to do better to find good homes for their injured racehorses than hand them over to a dealer.

  3. Sharon

    Wonderful story! It is great to see people doing the right thing. Hopefully with peer pressure we will start to see the pendulum swing with all breeders. Very well done to the Barraclough’s and Saratoga Glen Farm.

    Sharon
    http://www.ShopForPuppy.com

  4. KWebers

    Excellent to hear of the Barraclough’s commitment to their horses, and I appreciate the breeders and owners who follow thru on that. But the day can’t come soon enough when there are not 150,000 US horses shipped weekly to slaughter plants in Canada, and an equal number to Mexican plants:
    http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/usda/ams/AL_LS635.txt
    If not as a nation, but as a people, how can we condone that this fully unregulated species is — with a wink and a nod — allowed to be treated as a human food item in other countries? Bute, wormers … how does this national “irresponsibility” effect the US’ standing among the international community? Or on the foods and goods that the US produces? Shame on us.
    Never doubt that profit is rule number one, and we only need to look at the ever-wealthier AQHA and their embrace of artificial insemination to see who’s chasing that cash cow and leading the effort to have the federal bills banning horse slaughter for human consumption defeated in Washington DC, session after session.
    America, the land where profits trump the humane treatment of horses.
    http://www.vetsforequinewelfare.org/medications.php
    http://www.americanhorsemeat.com/

  5. Michelle Y.

    I am so happy to read another story of responsible breeders. Kudos to the Barracloughs for doing the right thing by their horses. They definitely have the right mindset, these horses have allowed them the lifestyle they enjoy, it’s only right to watch out for those horses down the road.

  6. Cynthia M.

    The Barraclough’s are the dream horse breeders. Thanks to them for doing what they do. Hopefully their attitude will rub off.

  7. Isabella

    I really wish all breeders were as wonderful as these great people are. 🙂

  8. Rebecca Fetterman Vensel

    May blessings continue on the Barracloughs and their Saratoga Glen Farm. What a beautiful day it will be when all breeders, of all horse breeds, take on the responsibility of caring for those they initiate into the world…at least to the best of their ability as this couple are demonstrating.

    1. Viktoria KS

      Agree totally Rebecca. But it also requires that people don’t breed more than they can take responsibility for, when that inevitable/high probability call for help comes.

  9. LindaVA

    Kudos to these wonderful responsible breeders for taking her back and helping her have a wonderful life!

  10. edna

    There are people who care about the horses they raise and welcome them back when they need to come home again. Maybe there’s a new wave that’s getting some much needed visibility. Whether its a mustang or a thoroughbred, we need to take care of them.

  11. Wendy

    The Barraclough’s are folks that know whats right and back it up with actions not just lip service.

  12. Lucy

    I want to say how heartwarming it is to read about responsible horse breeders and owners like the Barraclough’s !!

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