Photo of the Week: Analyze this

Analysis, a Thoroughbred racehorse in the Mosaic Racing Stables, hacks out on a clay road filled with distractions. Photo courtesy Barry Bornstein

Analysis, a Thoroughbred racehorse in the Mosaic Racing Stables, hacks out on a clay road filled with distractions. Photo courtesy Barry Bornstein

Analysis, a racehorse with Mosaic Racing Stables, is a very well adapted guy. Cross-trained as a hunter/jumper when he isn’t on the Belmont track winning races, he takes just about everything in his stride.

Here he is in Aiken on his way to the sand lot (jumping field) with a hunter/jumper rider Rylee Zimmerman to work on trot poles, circles and bending exercises. On the way to his lesson, Analysis hacked down a clay road filled with people and commotion. Analysis ventures out once a week to train for a future career, even as he puts in wins as a racehorse. Last year, he won at Belmont and Saratoga and had two seconds, according to Monica Driver, and earned $119,000.

His grounded personality is in part due to race training that incorporates prepping for a future career (hunter/jumpers in his case) as well as plenty of vacation time. “This is our way of making sure he knows more than just going fast in a big circle,” says Driver, managing partner of Mosaic Racing Stables.

Gallagher’s Stud sends 3 loads of hay to TRF

Mallory Mort, left, of Gallagher's  Stud, has helped kick off the 2015 Thoroughbred Retirement  Foundation hay drive in a big way!

Mallory Mort, left, of Gallagher’s Stud, has helped kick off the 2015 Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation hay drive in a big way!

When the Thoroughbred Retirement Foundation launched its annual hay drive to feed its herd of 900 retired racehorses, the country’s largest Thoroughbred charity was able to launch with a tremendous boost from a New York stud farm.

Gallagher’s Stud, a New York horse farm, and home to three-time stakes winner Inimitable Romanee, has donated a total of three tractor-trailers piled high with good-quality hay.

The donated hay was shipped to the The Second Chances program at the Wallkill Correctional Facility, where retired racehorses in the TRF herd are cared for by inmates in a partnership that provides valuable horsemanship training to inmates, who will one day return to society with the new skills the horses have taught them.

The program has long been admired by Gallagher’s Stud farm manager Mallory Mort. So, when the TRF’s hay drive coincided with an abundant crop, he and Gallagher’s Stud cofounder Marlene Brody quickly decided to donate the excess hay.

Sir Prize Birthday is one of the many TRF Thoroughbreds helping inmates at the Wallkill Correctional Facility.

Sir Prize Birthday is one of the many TRF Thoroughbreds helping inmates at the Wallkill Correctional Facility.

“I’d been reading about what they’ve been doing at Wallkill with the inmates, and it sounded like a really great program,” Mort says. “We had extra hay, so I went to Mrs. Brody, who has always been very supportive of the TRF, and suggested we donate.”

The 550-acre farm, which was founded in 1979 and which makes its own hay, has enjoyed bumper crops in recent years. And twice, the farm has shared its bounty with the TRF.

The donation from Gallagher’s Stud, combined with a $50,000 pledge from the Geoffrey Hughes Estate, has been tremendously helpful in the launch of the TRF’s seventh annual hay drive, which was kicked off earlier this month, says Diana Pikulski, the TRF’s vice president of external affairs.

“We’re starting off with a nice boost,” she says, noting that the goal of the drive is to raise enough funds to meet the 2015 hay cost, which is expected to exceed $220,000.

Herd Manager Sara Davenport notes that a Thoroughbred consumes approximately 22 pounds of hay everyday. “It’s one of our greatest annual expenses,” Davenport says. “And we’re so grateful for donations of any size during the hay drive.”

To learn more about the TRF’s annual Hay Drive or to contribute a “virtual” bale of hay, please call: (518) 226-0028, or visit: http://www.trfinc.org/trf-launches-seventh-annual-hay-drive-with-50000-pledge/.

Secretariat’s birthplace named Va. landmark

Secretariat in his famous foal picture, taken at the Meadow Farm. Photo courtesy Leeanne Meadows Ladin

Secretariat in his famous foal picture, taken at the Meadow Farm. Photo courtesy Leeanne Meadows Ladin

(Press Release)— The birthplace of 1973 Triple Crown champion Secretariat was named to the Virginia Landmarks Register by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources March 19.

Known as the Meadow Historic District, the designation includes the foaling shed where Secretariat was born on March 30, 1970; his training barn, where he wore his first saddle and bridle; the yearling barn where he stayed as a colt; and a yearling barn annex, stallion barn, horse cemetery, well house and pump house. Most of the structures were built in the 1930s by Christopher T. Chenery, the founder of Meadow Stable. They are located in Caroline County, in what is now known as The Meadow Event Park, owned by the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation.

This famous shed is now a historic preservation site.

This famous shed is now a historic preservation site.

Secretariat’s record-shattering Triple Crown victories earned him the title of “America’s Super Horse” and remain unsurpassed to this day. ESPN named him among its top 50 athletes of the 20th century, and TIME, Newsweek and Sports Illustrated featured him on their covers. Secretariat transcended his sport to attain hero status in the popular culture of the time. The big red stallion, owned and raced by Penny Chenery, was beloved by millions, regardless of whether they knew anything about horses or horse racing. In recent years, his enduring popularity has enjoyed a resurgence due to the Disney feature film Secretariat.

“I am deeply honored that the birthplace of Secretariat is now listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register as the Meadow Historic District,” Penny Chenery said. “This designation is a fitting tribute to the land, our horses and my father’s legacy.”

VFBF President Wayne F. Pryor said that organization “is extremely pleased about this important historic designation for the birthplace of Secretariat at The Meadow. We are proud to be the stewards of the Virginia farm that produced an American legend, and we invite all fans of Secretariat to come visit.”

The Meadow was founded in 1805 by Dr. Charles S. Morris, an ancestor of Christopher Chenery. Chenery purchased the farm in 1936 and transformed it into one of the most famous racing stables of its time.

The Meadow was founded in 1805 by Dr. Charles S. Morris, an ancestor of Christopher Chenery. Chenery purchased the farm in 1936 and transformed it into one of the most famous racing stables of its time.

Leeanne Meadows Ladin, Secretariat tourism manager at The Meadow Event Park and co-author of Secretariat’s Meadow – The Land, the Family, The Legend, said, “We definitely will be celebrating the Meadow historic designation at the Secretariat birthday event next week.” Ladin coordinated the research and documentation for the nomination process. She noted the substantial support of the George Washington Regional Planning Commission, planners Diana Utz and Danny Reese, historic preservationist Eden Brown and the Caroline County Department of Economic Development and Tourism throughout the nomination effort.

The Department of Historic Resources will forward the Meadow materials to the National Park Service for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. That process takes about 60 days.

Meadow Stable produced many notable Thoroughbreds in addition to Secretariat. Outstanding but overshadowed was Riva Ridge, who won the 1972 Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes. In 1971, his winnings saved Meadow Stable from the auction block when Penny Chenery’s family was pressuring her to sell the farm and all the horses. Other champions include Hill Prince, 1950 Horse of the Year; First Landing, sire of Riva Ridge; Sir Gaylord, 1962 Kentucky Derby contender; Cicada, top money-winning filly of the 1960s; and the great broodmares Somethingroyal, dam (mother) of Secretariat; Hildene; Imperatrice; and Iberia, to name a few.

The Meadow was founded in 1805 by Dr. Charles S. Morris, an ancestor of Christopher Chenery. Chenery purchased the farm in 1936 and transformed it into one of the most famous racing stables of its time. The farm was sold in 1979, changing hands several times before Farm Bureau became sole owner in 2013. The Meadow Event Park is the site of the annual State Fair of Virginia, the Virginia Horse Festival, K95 CountryFest at The Meadow, Illuminate Light Show, regional horse shows, trade shows, weddings and many other events. For more information, visit www.meadoweventpark.com.

The Secretariat Birthday Celebration is part of the new Virginia Horse Festival taking placeMarch 27-29. For more information on the celebration and The Meadow’s year-round narrated tour program conducted by Ladin, visit www.secretariatsmeadow.com. For the complete schedule of activities and ticket information for the Virginia Horse Festival, visitwww.virginiahorsefestival.com. Contact Leeanne Ladin, laladin@verizon.net 804-363-1683.

Please see a related story about Secretariat’s grandson Covert Action. He will appear at the Meadow this month: http://offtrackthoroughbreds.com/2015/03/18/secretariat-grandson-to-help-honor-the-legend/